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Full Version: Frank Robinson in Failing Health
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Great player (childhood favorite of mine together with his brother Brooks ;) ), Triple Crown winner, first Black manager in each league (including Giants), from Bay Area. 

https://www.sfchronicle.com/sports/artic...1932dab52e
(01-30-2019, 08:52 PM)TreesAndBirds Wrote: [ -> ]Great player (childhood favorite of mine together with his brother Brooks ;) ), Triple Crown winner, first Black manager in each league (including Giants), from Bay Area. 

https://www.sfchronicle.com/sports/artic...1932dab52e

only player to win the MVP in both the NL and AL
When we played McClymonds at old skin diamond Raimondi Field one of the Mack guys told us about Robinson hitting one over the projects beyond the LF fence. Looked like about 500’. He played in the same OF with Vada Pinson and on rec teams with Curt Flood. A great athletic legacy including Bill Russell, Paul Silas, Joe Ellis and the Pointer Brothers (and sisters).
I always liked Frank Robinson. He played at McClymonds High with Vada Pinson and Curt Flood.  He received death threats in the early parts of his career, and waved a pistol in a Cincinnati restaurant in 1965, causing him to be traded from the Reds to the Orioles.  The GM of the Reds, Bill DeWitt, famously said "He's an old 30," when asked why he traded Robinson.  The next year, Frank's first with the Orioles, he won the Triple Crown, was named AL MVP, and MVP of the world series when the Orioles beat the Dodgers in four straight. Frank hit two of Baltimore's four home runs in that World Series.

I have an interesting little anecdote involving Frank Robinson when he was manager of the Giants.  In the early 1980s, the Giants would play an annual charity game against a local college, frequently Stanford.  One or two of the Giants regulars would show up for the game.   In 1983 or 1984, they played Santa Clara University, and one of the Santa Clara students -- a former catcher at St. Ignatius and played as a frosh at Santa Clara -- decided to play a little prank.  He calls the SCU athletic director office and says that any game involving an NL team must have at least one NL umpire, even charitable games.  The AD readily agrees, and the student shows up to the game in legitimate, current NL umpiring gear.  The three WCC umpires are fawning all over this kid ("What's Mike Schmidt really like?") and they ask him if he wants to umpire behind home plate.  The student -- who looked very old for his age -- "graciously" demurs and says he'll take third base, thinking he'll be safe there.

Lo and behold, there's a close play at third base, and the student makes the wrong call.  Frank Robinson sprints out of the dugout and verbally tears the kid a new one.  The student later told me "Up until that moment, it seemed like a really good idea."
Frank also played basketball with Bill Russell
IIRC the trade was Frank Robinson for Milt Pappas.  Ranks right up there with Orlando Cepeda for Ray Sadecki.

Edit: I looked it up and besides Pappas the Reds got two nondescript journeymen.
(01-31-2019, 12:49 PM)qwerty49 Wrote: [ -> ]IIRC the trade was Frank Robinson for Milt Pappas.  Ranks right up there with Orlando Cepeda for Ray Sadecki.

Edit: I looked it up and besides Pappas the Reds got two nondescript journeymen.

They got Jack Baldschun, who was a pretty good pitcher earlier in his career but had injuries when he joined the Reds.  He went 4-12 for the Reds' minor league AAA team, then joined the Padres as a reliever and went 8-2 over the last two seasons of his career.  Simpson was a very poor-hitting, last-guy-on-the-bench outfielder.

In the years after the trade, Pappas had a 29.4 career WAR, Robinson was 43.4 -- because he was a much better player than Pappas.  I always liked Pappas when I was a little kid.  He played in the big leagues for 17 years, with 12 winning seasons, three .500 seasons and two losing seasons, finishing 209-164 for his career, though his worst years were with Cincinnati.  Stupid trade.
Also, Jim Hines.

Russell first NBA AA coach. Robinson first MLB AA manager.

Other Bay Area HS with great sports legacy is Serra: Bonds, Brady, Swann. Greg Jeffries. Maybe not the depth of McClymonds. But still....

(01-31-2019, 11:44 AM)Phogge Wrote: [ -> ]When we played McClymonds at old skin diamond Raimondi Field one of the Mack guys told us about Robinson hitting one over the projects beyond the LF fence. Looked like about 500’. He played in the same OF with Vada Pinson and on rec teams with Curt Flood. A great athletic legacy including Bill Russell, Paul Silas, Joe Ellis and the Pointer Brothers (and sisters).
Galileo... The three DiMaggios, Lazzeri, Liusetti, OJ, Lawson Little, Bobby Brown, No Neck Williams.
A sad day.
Nice video of his mlb career (although from a bit of a Baltimore perspective). As we’ve noted his accomplishments were more than just as a player, but also as a manager, executive and role model. Hard to think of too many whose mlb influence has been as broad and deep. 


https://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/orio...story.html



Frank Robinson's family has asked that, in lieu of flowers, contributions in Frank’s memory can be made to the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis, Tennessee or the National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, D.C.
— Joe Trezza (@JoeTrezz) February 7, 2019
The Civil Rights Museum is a must see when in Memphis. Incorporates the Lorraine Motel.
This is a 45 min ESPN video of Frank’s life. Obviously long but lots of great stories, film and old time player interviews (Maury Wills especially good).

From Frank crediting his high school coach for replacing the switchblade in his hand with a bat, to Pete Rose saying that the Reds mgmt told him not to hang around with Frank (and the other the Black players), to Frank talking about almost drowning at a team party, to Pres. Reagan’s call to Frank when he was managing the O’s during a 21 game losing streak, to Bob Lurie talking about the decision to hire Frank, and many stories about his toughness, both on and off the field. 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pv4YHRBtt_...e=youtu.be
His coach was the legendary George Powles.