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(10-06-2016, 11:16 AM)Boston Card link Wrote:Looks like automobile technology may be the killer app for graphene.  HEre's one car company looking to make its body panels out of the stuff.

http://www.motorauthority.com/news/11054...ene-panels

BC

The BAC Mono.  Now there is a graphene application I can get on board with.  But even as cool as that vehicle is, the chance of graphene nanobots swimming around in our body is where its at.

Michio Kaku had me at Elephant +  pencil + graphene.



(10-06-2016, 11:16 AM)Boston Card link Wrote:Looks like automobile technology may be the killer app for graphene.  HEre's one car company looking to make its body panels out of the stuff.

http://www.motorauthority.com/news/11054...ene-panels

BC

Hmm, do endurance race cars use graphene parts anywhere? It in stuff like the 24 hours of Le Mans is where lots of crazy high advanced efficiency technologies show up.
My search for this thread turned up thirteen different threads using the word "Graphene".  I consider that an indicator of the unique nature of this board.

In any event, I just learned that Mildred Dresselhaus, one of the pioneers in graphene research, passed away at the age of 86.  She spent her career at MIT and apparently was a highly regarded teacher, as well as a talented researcher.  From her obituary, "She was particularly well known for her work on nanomaterials and other nanostructural systems based on layered materials, like grapheme..."

http://news.mit.edu/2017/institute-profe...es-86-0221

A life well-lived.



(03-05-2017, 08:53 AM)BigEasyCard link Wrote:In any event, I just learned that Mildred Dresselhaus, one of the pioneers in graphene research, passed away at the age of 86. 

It was a sad day when we heard Millie died two weeks ago.
She taught me how to figure out whether atoms are intercalating between layers as happens in graphite - her specialty, or one of her specilaties anyway. It led to one of the main themes of my research.

My close colleague had been her friend for 60 years, since she was Millie Spiewak. He took it pretty hard.

She died just two weeks after GE had released a commercial promoting women in science and promoting her as a rock star.
A UK-based team of researchers has created a graphene-based sieve capable of removing salt from seawater.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39482342
Every time this thread bubbles back up to the top, I crack a smile.

BC
(04-04-2017, 12:44 PM)eric link Wrote:A UK-based team of researchers has created a graphene-based sieve capable of removing salt from seawater.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39482342

Sounds like you could make an effective survival tool from this membrane for marine applications.
https://www.levelninesports.com/head-mon...oduct-tabs

I was looking to get myself some new skis, and saw these were highly recommended.  But now that I see they "feature Graphene technology which reinforces the ski keeping it stiff and responsive but very lightweight at the same time." I'm definitely going to fall for the marketing and buy them, LOL.

Actually, they are well rated skis, and I like my 8 year old Monsters, and the after-season price is pretty good, so I may pull the trigger.  I will let you guys know how well the "graphene technology" works.

BC
(04-07-2017, 07:35 PM)Boston Card link Wrote:https://www.levelninesports.com/head-mon...oduct-tabs

I was looking to get myself some new skis, and saw these were highly recommended.  But now that I see they "feature Graphene technology which reinforces the ski keeping it stiff and responsive but very lightweight at the same time." I'm definitely going to fall for the marketing and buy them, LOL.

Actually, they are well rated skis, and I like my 8 year old Monsters, and the after-season price is pretty good, so I may pull the trigger.  I will let you guys know how well the "graphene technology" works.

BC

Just don't read their pseudo-technical marketing blurb too closely. Highly bogus.

I am personally rather suspicious that their graphene is just graphite, though that can still be great in skis. Like my Blizzard Brahmas with graphite tips a lot - but I am an east coast skier (except at this very moment at Snowbird).
Oh believe me, I know it is BS.  There was a heavy dose of sarcasm in my post, but I realize it doesn't always carry through to internet posts.  As I said, I would purchase them because I like my 8 year old monsters and the price is right, not because of their "Graphene technology".

BC
Recently, a team of researchers at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT) developed a “graphene ball,” a unique battery material that enables a 45% increase in capacity, and five times faster charging speeds than standard lithium-ion batteries. The breakthrough provides promise for the next generation secondary battery market, particularly related to mobile devices and electric vehicles.

https://news.samsung.com/global/samsung-...ging-speed
UCLA chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat

Tiny structures could be next-generation solution for smaller electronic devices

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/ucla-c...lectronics
(12-09-2017, 01:04 PM)eric link Wrote:UCLA chemists synthesize narrow ribbons of graphene using only light and heat

Tiny structures could be next-generation solution for smaller electronic devices

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/ucla-c...lectronics

Yeah, but they can't figure out how to beat Stanford in football.

[Image: swag-gif-17.gif]

Scientists Discover Process for Transitioning Two-Layer Graphene into a Diamond-Hard Material on Impact

The innovation could enable development of a range of flexible, impenetrable materials capable of protecting the body and fragile objects

http://www.asrc.cuny.edu/2017/12/18/diamene-study/

the paper is here

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-0...cience.com
Scientists Discover Process for Transitioning Two-Layer Graphene into a Diamond-Hard Material on Impact

The innovation could enable development of a range of flexible, impenetrable materials capable of protecting the body and fragile objects

http://www.asrc.cuny.edu/2017/12/18/diamene-study/

the paper is here

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-0...cience.com
(12-21-2017, 05:34 PM)eric link Wrote:Scientists Discover Process for Transitioning Two-Layer Graphene into a Diamond-Hard Material on Impact

The innovation could enable development of a range of flexible, impenetrable materials capable of protecting the body and fragile objects

http://www.asrc.cuny.edu/2017/12/18/diamene-study/

the paper is here

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-0...cience.com

In Jr High I remember reading some 1950s SciFi about a society of assassins who only used knives since a fast-pressure responsive fabric had been developed that completely resisted projectiles, but could be penetrated by the slow pressure of an edged weapon. My suspension of disbelief is now formally retired; thanks!
(12-21-2017, 05:34 PM)eric link Wrote:Scientists Discover Process for Transitioning Two-Layer Graphene into a Diamond-Hard Material on Impact

The innovation could enable development of a range of flexible, impenetrable materials capable of protecting the body and fragile objects

http://www.asrc.cuny.edu/2017/12/18/diamene-study/

the paper is here

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-0...cience.com

In Jr High I remember reading some 1950s SciFi about a society of assassins who only used knives since a fast-pressure responsive fabric had been developed that completely resisted projectiles, but could be penetrated by the slow pressure of an edged weapon. My suspension of disbelief is now formally retired; thanks!
A couple of observations on the Geim-Novoselov Nobel prize for graphene. It was awarded in 2010, IIRC not that long after its discovery. If the commercial uses for graphene are not well established even now, they certainly were not back then. Usually the Nobel committee waits for the value of a discovery to be proven before awarding a prize. So the graphene Nobel was awarded unusually early. Novoselov was only 36 when he won the prize, making him one of the youngest winners ever.
A couple of observations on the Geim-Novoselov Nobel prize for graphene. It was awarded in 2010, IIRC not that long after its discovery. If the commercial uses for graphene are not well established even now, they certainly were not back then. Usually the Nobel committee waits for the value of a discovery to be proven before awarding a prize. So the graphene Nobel was awarded unusually early. Novoselov was only 36 when he won the prize, making him one of the youngest winners ever.
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