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Outside Topic Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - Printable Version

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Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - yvonne - 02-11-2019

Quote:The body was reported about 10 a.m. in the Engineering Quad, near the Packard Electrical Engineering Building, according to the Stanford Daily.

https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/Mans-Body-Discovered-on-Stanford-University-Campus-Sheriff-505701391.html

Quote:A dead body was found in the Engineering Quad near the Packard Electrical Engineering Building, prompting police to close off the area as an investigation into the matter by the Santa Clara County Sheriff’s Department is underway. 
The University is currently compiling a statement with details of the incident, according to Public Safety spokesperson Bill Larson.
The Santa Clara Medical Examiner will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause of death, Larson added.

https://www.stanforddaily.com/2019/02/11/dead-body-found-in-engineering-quad/


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - newguy - 02-11-2019

apparently it was a male graduate student.
https://www.stanforddaily.com/2019/02/11/male-graduate-student-found-dead-in-engineering-building/


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - yvonne - 02-11-2019

Suicide is the suspected cause of death

Quote:If you have thoughts of suicide or are concerned about the well-being of another, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or Stanford’s Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at (650) 498-2336.



RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - Stymie - 02-12-2019

Sad story, but what relevance does this factoid have to do vis a vis Cardboard members interests?  If it does, we may want to open up any non-Athletics issues, including all sorts of political or graphene comments.  No?


Leftcoast - Leftcoast - 02-12-2019

Stanford related and clearly labeled as off topic.  Works for me ... but then I appreciated the more free wheeling days on this board.


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - fullmetal - 02-12-2019

A lot of us have connections to Stanford Engineering as well as Stanford Athletics.  Condolences to the student's family and friends :(


RE: Leftcoast - Phogge - 02-12-2019

(02-12-2019, 12:48 AM)Leftcoast Wrote:  Stanford related and clearly labeled as off topic.  Works for me ... but then I appreciated the more free wheeling days on this board.

I’m from Thunderdome so I love freewheeling but I’m here since I need intervention.


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - BostonCard - 02-12-2019

(02-12-2019, 12:14 AM)Stymie Wrote:  Sad story, but what relevance does this factoid have to do vis a vis Cardboard members interests?  If it does, we may want to open up any non-Athletics issues, including all sorts of political or graphene comments.  No?

The graphene thread is still out there and periodically gets revived, as does the coffee thread, and I just started a music thread about a week ago (this is another periodic tradition on this board).  We also get plenty of Giants trivia, especially in the summer when Stanford athletics is quieter. There is no restriction about posting things that are off topic as long as they are labelled as such, and nobody does it so frequently that it is against the spirit of this board.

Politics is off limits because it is unfortunately too easy for things to go off the rails.  It's not my personal preference, but that is neither here nor there.

BC


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - ColoradoTree - 02-12-2019

I think all of us on this board love Stanford, and supporting its athletic teams is the most fun way we get to deepen the connection to the place that we love. But if there's big, newsworthy stuff about Stanford, whether good or bad, I want to know about it, even if it's only tangentially related (or completely unrelated) to Stanford sports.

I hear the point that we run the risk of dividing the Board when we get beyond the tribal unifiers that are Stanford sports, and that's always something to keep in mind. We don't need to discuss the ins and outs of daily campus life, or ResEd's view of the broader Greek community (though Theta Delt gets to keep its house for now!), but this is something shocking that happened on campus, and that seems like the kind of thing that's totally appropriate to let folks on this Board know about. We are a community here, after all, and things like this are profound shocks to the entire Stanford community. I'm certainly not glad to know it happened, but it feels right that I do. 

If nothing else, it's a powerful, Stanford-related reminder that there are more important things than sports. I hope the student's family and friends eventually find some peace and understanding surrounding this.


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - Redrum - 02-12-2019

It's Stanford related, unless things have really changed it (thankfully) IS news to find dead bodies around campus and presumably not just another ho-hum event.  As a news story it will have self-limiting life span.  Got no problem with it. Pure information and its not like the Cardboard is posting it to pump up our ratings during sweeps week.


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - M T - 02-12-2019

For those of us that are decades removed from college days, these events are stark reminders of the emotional turmoil that happens with relative high frequency in the student population.  (And, if you think about the surrounding neighborhoods, "student" isn't limited to college students.)

I hope it is ok to push this off-topic thread onto topic.

We've recently seen references to depression in Stanford athletes.  Unfortunately that happens.  My belief is that Stanford, and all schools, actively work toward providing resources and support to avert things ever getting even close to the point of ANY student seriously contemplating suicide.  I imagine some schools do more than others, and some schools are more, or less, effective.

I was curious if there are statistics showing whether student-athletes are more or less or equal at risk of suicide than non-athlete students.  I found this reference of a 9-year study counting suicides & suspected suicides in NCAA athletes.
  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4547116/

Some of the highlights from that paper are
Quote:The overall suicide rate [for NCAA student athletes] was 0.93/100,000 per year. Suicide represented 7.3% (35/477) of all-cause mortality among NCAA student athletes.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports a suicide incidence of 11.6/100,000 for individuals aged 18 to 22 years, while studies of suicide among college students demonstrate an incidence of 7.5/100,000.

The suicide rate in NCAA athletes appears to be lower than that of the general and collegiate population of similar age. NCAA male athletes have a significantly higher rate of suicide compared with female athletes, and football athletes appear to be at greatest risk.


Athletes have substantially higher self-esteem and social connectedness while exhibiting lower levels of depression than nonathletes. Participation on a college sports team significantly reduces the likelihood of seriously considering, planning, or attempting suicide.  Male nonathletes were 2.5 times as likely to be suicidal than their athlete peers, while female nonathletes were 1.67 times as likely to report suicidal behavior as their athlete peers.

Before I credit college attendance and athletics as positive agents, I want to point out that the student population and the athlete population are selected subgroups.   The attributes of each student-athlete's character, health, and environment that allowed them to go to college and to participate at a high level of athletics may be more important than just that they participated in college athletics (team effects, discipline, schedule, focus, etc.).

(These numbers could be used to indicate that any program designed to help student-athletes with such emotional problems should be redirected to help all students, or even better, the wider community.)


RE: Dead Body Found in Engineering Quad - Mick - 02-13-2019

(02-12-2019, 06:31 PM)M T Wrote:  For those of us that are decades removed from college days, these events are stark reminders of the emotional turmoil that happens with relative high frequency in the student population.  (And, if you think about the surrounding neighborhoods, "student" isn't limited to college students.)

I hope it is ok to push this off-topic thread onto topic.

We've recently seen references to depression in Stanford athletes.  Unfortunately that happens.  My belief is that Stanford, and all schools, actively work toward providing resources and support to avert things ever getting even close to the point of ANY student seriously contemplating suicide.  I imagine some schools do more than others, and some schools are more, or less, effective.

I was curious if there are statistics showing whether student-athletes are more or less or equal at risk of suicide than non-athlete students.  I found this reference of a 9-year study counting suicides & suspected suicides in NCAA athletes.
  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4547116/

Some of the highlights from that paper are
Quote:The overall suicide rate [for NCAA student athletes] was 0.93/100,000 per year. Suicide represented 7.3% (35/477) of all-cause mortality among NCAA student athletes.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports a suicide incidence of 11.6/100,000 for individuals aged 18 to 22 years, while studies of suicide among college students demonstrate an incidence of 7.5/100,000.

The suicide rate in NCAA athletes appears to be lower than that of the general and collegiate population of similar age. NCAA male athletes have a significantly higher rate of suicide compared with female athletes, and football athletes appear to be at greatest risk.


Athletes have substantially higher self-esteem and social connectedness while exhibiting lower levels of depression than nonathletes. Participation on a college sports team significantly reduces the likelihood of seriously considering, planning, or attempting suicide.  Male nonathletes were 2.5 times as likely to be suicidal than their athlete peers, while female nonathletes were 1.67 times as likely to report suicidal behavior as their athlete peers.

Before I credit college attendance and athletics as positive agents, I want to point out that the student population and the athlete population are selected subgroups.   The attributes of each student-athlete's character, health, and environment that allowed them to go to college and to participate at a high level of athletics may be more important than just that they participated in college athletics (team effects, discipline, schedule, focus, etc.).

(These numbers could be used to indicate that any program designed to help student-athletes with such emotional problems should be redirected to help all students, or even better, the wider community.)

I think it's important to have a degree of social connectedness when a student arrives on campus, or to at least gain one as quickly as possible.  Both of my sons specifically mentioned to me how helpful it was that they had a built-in social structure when they arrived.  For one of them, nine years after he entered school, he still socializes with that same group.  For the other, he joined other groups very quickly.  I think athletics (and other groups) allows for social cohesion, though it may be artificial at first.