The CardBoard
A simple question? - Printable Version

+- The CardBoard (https://thecardboard.org/board)
+-- Forum: C-House! (https://thecardboard.org/board/forumdisplay.php?fid=4)
+--- Forum: The CARDboard (https://thecardboard.org/board/forumdisplay.php?fid=5)
+--- Thread: A simple question? (/showthread.php?tid=20940)



A simple question? - lex24 - 11-21-2020

Is there any proof that playing college football games has contributed to the spread?  I have a friend whose son is a College basketball coach.  The rule at his school is that the players if they leave campus have to quarantine for 14 days. That none of them can go home for Thanksgiving etc. Even if home is 10 minutes away. So they don’t leave because if they do they can’t practice and they’re not gonna be able to play.

I suspect that is a rule that is in many conferences, colleges etc. surrounding college athletics. So I repeat my question - is there evidence that this has contributed to the spread? I realize there’s a lot out there in terms of people suggesting how awful it is that they’re doing this and that were selfish to even watch it.  But show me some evidence. I mean let’s take a simple question: is there a higher rate amongst college football players then there is amongst their peers within their age group?

 Then let’s go to question two -  assuming the answer to question number one is yes: are these players taking their virus out into the “general public“ at a higher rate. 

 Or, conversely, is there perhaps a lower rate amongst college players – and given the fact that I think most of them are in quasi-lockdown mode,  a lower chance that they actually spread the virus amongst their loved ones etc. 

 I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. But it seems to me to be relevant to the issue.


RE: A simple question? - Jamesy - 11-21-2020

(11-21-2020, 07:29 PM)lex24 Wrote:  Is there any proof that playing college football games has contributed to the spread?  I have a friend whose son is a College basketball coach.  The rule at his school is that the players if they leave campus have to quarantine for 14 days. That none of them can go home for Thanksgiving etc.  Even if home is 10 minutes away. So they don’t leave because if they do they can’t practice and they’re not gonna be able to play.

I suspect that is a rule that is in many conferences, colleges etc. surrounding college athletics. So I repeat my question - is there evidence that this has contributed to the spread? I realize there’s a lot out there in terms of people suggesting how awful it is that they’re doing this and that were selfish to even watch it.  But show me some evidence. I mean let’s take a simple question: is there a higher rate amongst college football players then there is amongst their peers within their age group?

 Then let’s go to question two -  assuming the answer to question number one is yes: are these players taking their virus out into the “general public“ at a higher rate. 

 Or, conversely, is there perhaps a lower rate amongst college players – and given the fact that I think most of them are in quasi-lockdown mode,  a lower chance that they actually spread the virus amongst their loved ones etc. 

 I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. But it seems to me to be relevant to the issue.

From what I’ve seen, no evidence of transmission on the football field. However, basketball is a much different environment that seems more risky.


lex24 - lex24 - 11-21-2020

(11-21-2020, 07:53 PM)Jamesy Wrote:  
(11-21-2020, 07:29 PM)lex24 Wrote:  Is there any proof that playing college football games has contributed to the spread?  I have a friend whose son is a College basketball coach.  The rule at his school is that the players if they leave campus have to quarantine for 14 days. That none of them can go home for Thanksgiving etc.  Even if home is 10 minutes away. So they don’t leave because if they do they can’t practice and they’re not gonna be able to play.

I suspect that is a rule that is in many conferences, colleges etc. surrounding college athletics. So I repeat my question - is there evidence that this has contributed to the spread? I realize there’s a lot out there in terms of people suggesting how awful it is that they’re doing this and that were selfish to even watch it.  But show me some evidence. I mean let’s take a simple question: is there a higher rate amongst college football players then there is amongst their peers within their age group?

 Then let’s go to question two -  assuming the answer to question number one is yes: are these players taking their virus out into the “general public“ at a higher rate. 

 Or, conversely, is there perhaps a lower rate amongst college players – and given the fact that I think most of them are in quasi-lockdown mode,  a lower chance that they actually spread the virus amongst their loved ones etc. 

 I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. But it seems to me to be relevant to the issue.

From what I’ve seen, no evidence of transmission on the football field. However, basketball is a much different environment that seems more risky.

I don’t think the issue has ever been transmission on the field itself. And that’s not really where I was going with my questions; although I appreciate your response. It’s just with the general situation - kids being together, locker room, etc. etc. etc. There should be some indication I would think of how the “college football population” compares to the “non-college football population” within its age group.


RE: A simple question? - BostonCard - 11-21-2020

I have not seen evidence that college athletics is spreading COVID-19, although the virus is so widespread that it would be difficult to see (and you have the added challenge that we often don't find things out until after the fact).  For example, there was no evidence that the Sturgis motorcycle rally caused the spread of COVID until a month after the fact.

I think the analogy is to a ship taking in water.  You are trying to dump all the ballast you can to keep the ship from sinking.  Maybe the piano in the corner is not contributing as much to the ship's weight as a bunch of other stuff, and it's keeping the passengers calm at a very tragic time.  So maybe your instinct is to not throw it overboard if you can avoid it, but if you are trying desperately not to issue the abandon ship order then at some point you say push everything that is not bolted down out, and that might include the piano after all.  I think that's where we are with college football, because the alternative is issuing a renewed lockdown, as much of Europe has had to do.

BC


RE: A simple question? - PVTree - 11-22-2020

I'm waiting to read about covid spreading after USB students rushed the field. That's an obvious incident that may lead to some positive virus results. I thought I read that the school is making all students get tested before they're allowed to register for classes.


RE: A simple question? - 81alum - 11-22-2020

The big problem has to do with housing students on campuses.  In order to put those football players on the field you first have to put them in a dorm.  It is where they live and eat, not where they play the game, that the spread happens.  And there is a great deal of evidence that housing students on campuses has been a major contributor to the spread of COVID, since students at universities (unless virtual) travel great distances from home to school, making a university a perfect vector.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/covid-college-cases-tracker.html

No doubt campuses can (and have) created different kinds of living conditions for their athletes than for the rest of their students in an effort to reduce risk.  Keeping most students virtual but housing athletes on campus, as Stanford has, is much more successful than what the SEC has done.  But even Pac-12 efforts have frequently failed, or else we would have played WSU this weekend, for instance. 

But worse, having athletes on campus (so as to keep athletic revenues from cratering) has been a driving force for many universities to reopen their campuses in general, rather than staying completely virtual.  So you could say that the effort to keep athletes in competition has contributed to the massive outbreaks of spread (321k cases) at American universities.  And the fact that most college students are not badly affected by the disease actually makes their potential for spreading it worse, not better, since they remain active and many are asymptomatic.  If they got sicker faster, they would know to isolate sooner.

Stanford has been doing things right.  We have had 175 cases.  Washington State, by contrast, has had 1,407.  I don't know how we pulled off the game with Colorado.  They have had 2,236 cases.  Oregon 595.  Cal 249.

But take a look at those universities that have in-person classes.  Just call them the nation's petri dishes.  Ohio State 4,665.  Alabama 3,219.  Georgia 4,387.


RE: A simple question? - StanfordMatt - 11-22-2020

(11-21-2020, 08:25 PM)BostonCard Wrote:  I have not seen evidence that college athletics is spreading COVID-19, although the virus is so widespread that it would be difficult to see (and you have the added challenge that we often don't find things out until after the fact).  For example, there was no evidence that the Sturgis motorcycle rally caused the spread of COVID until a month after the fact.

I think the analogy is to a ship taking in water.  You are trying to dump all the ballast you can to keep the ship from sinking.  Maybe the piano in the corner is not contributing as much to the ship's weight as a bunch of other stuff, and it's keeping the passengers calm at a very tragic time.  So maybe your instinct is to not throw it overboard if you can avoid it, but if you are trying desperately not to issue the abandon ship order then at some point you say push everything that is not bolted down out, and that might include the piano after all.  I think that's where we are with college football, because the alternative is issuing a renewed lockdown, as much of Europe has had to do.

BC

This is the best analogy I have read on the topic.


RE: A simple question? - Phogge - 11-22-2020

Stay safe Lexie. I am fortunate to live in a forest away from the public. Not quite Unabomber style but not bad. I venture out rarely for food. I work eight games at Levi on a level where there are only about 12 people. My assistant and I wear masks at all times. Everyone of the field takes a rapid test and then quarantines for two days. We are checked for temp before security. Most people however have to get along with their lives in public. Just like "Casino" why take a chance? Follow the protocols. Apparently if you attend Coastal Carolina games you follow few. And you get others sick.


RE: A simple question? - oregontim - 11-22-2020

I've been watching Notre Dame info after the big rush on the field two weeks ago. Here's all I could find:

https://apnews.com/article/notre-dame-mandates-virus-testing-c17e2508b16806ca8b0a0b750df0e218

Exec summary: mandatory testing, stricter enforcement of rules, but no outbreak so far.


RE: A simple question? - 82lsju - 11-22-2020

(11-22-2020, 01:31 PM)oregontim Wrote:  I've been watching Notre Dame info after the big rush on the field two weeks ago. Here's all I could find:

https://apnews.com/article/notre-dame-mandates-virus-testing-c17e2508b16806ca8b0a0b750df0e218

Exec summary: mandatory testing, stricter enforcement of rules, but no outbreak so far.

here's their COVID-19 dashboard

https://here.nd.edu/our-approach/dashboard/

and if there is an outbreak after yesterday it will be hard to track as that was the last day students could be in dorms

Quote:
  • Nov 21
    Undergraduate halls close at Noon


https://registrar.nd.edu/calendar/


RE: lex24 - Jamesy - 11-22-2020

(11-21-2020, 08:18 PM)lex24 Wrote:  
(11-21-2020, 07:53 PM)Jamesy Wrote:  
(11-21-2020, 07:29 PM)lex24 Wrote:  Is there any proof that playing college football games has contributed to the spread?  I have a friend whose son is a College basketball coach.  The rule at his school is that the players if they leave campus have to quarantine for 14 days. That none of them can go home for Thanksgiving etc.  Even if home is 10 minutes away. So they don’t leave because if they do they can’t practice and they’re not gonna be able to play.

I suspect that is a rule that is in many conferences, colleges etc. surrounding college athletics. So I repeat my question - is there evidence that this has contributed to the spread? I realize there’s a lot out there in terms of people suggesting how awful it is that they’re doing this and that were selfish to even watch it.  But show me some evidence. I mean let’s take a simple question: is there a higher rate amongst college football players then there is amongst their peers within their age group?

 Then let’s go to question two -  assuming the answer to question number one is yes: are these players taking their virus out into the “general public“ at a higher rate. 

 Or, conversely, is there perhaps a lower rate amongst college players – and given the fact that I think most of them are in quasi-lockdown mode,  a lower chance that they actually spread the virus amongst their loved ones etc. 

 I don’t know the answer to any of these questions. But it seems to me to be relevant to the issue.

From what I’ve seen, no evidence of transmission on the football field. However, basketball is a much different environment that seems more risky.

I don’t think the issue has ever been transmission on the field itself. And that’s not really where I was going with my questions; although I appreciate your response. It’s just with the general situation - kids being together, locker room, etc. etc. etc. There should be some indication I would think of how the “college football population” compares to the “non-college football population” within its age group.

In looking at all the athletic department press releases, there have been no COVID cases on the Stanford football team in at least two months. False positives in Oregon aside, of course.